World IP Day: inheritance books

world ip dayRhoda Baxter is the nom de plume of a UK-based IP practitioner who also writes romantic fiction. Her first novel, published in 2012, was originally called Patently in Love. It was reviewed on IPKat here. In the words of the book’s Amazon blurb:

A job in a patent law firm is a far cry from the glamorous existence of a popstar’s girlfriend. But it’s just what Jane Porter needs to distance herself from her cheating ex, Ashby, and the press furore that surrounds the wreckage of her love life.

Patently in Love was reissued in 2014 under the title Girl on the Run, presumably for sound commercial reasons. Is there a lesson here about the lack of appeal of IP to the general public?

Rhoda also writes a blog about creative writing. As a regular feature of the blog, Rhoda interviews other writers about their ‘inheritance books’. These are books which have some personal associations for the interviewee, and which they have inherited from a previous generation, or which they would pass on to the next generation.

To coincide with World IP Day 2016, Rhoda interviewed IP Draughts about his inheritance books. The results can be found here.

zitherIn the interview, IP Draughts refers to the books of the late Graham Greene, who was possibly the leading British novelist of the 20th century. IP Draughts is not aware of any major IP issue associated with Greene, but Greene was involved in at least one law suit. In 1937, Twentieth Century Fox successfully sued him for libel, for writing an article that suggested a sexual connotation to the film Wee Willie Winkie, which starred an 8-year-old Shirley Temple.

There is no charge for this valuable piece of information.

 

 

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