Why professional values matter

poppyEvery few years, political pressure is applied to the professions, to make them more like ordinary people, or to provide services in a similar way to high-street retailers, or to accept external regulation and complaints-handling, or to admit non-graduates to their ranks, or to allow external ownership by people who are not part of the profession, or to remove any remaining monopoly rights they may have in favour of more competition from unlicensed competitors.

Some of these pressures contradict one another. Increasing the burden of regulation on a profession, while at the same time allowing unregulated, non-professionals to provide the same services, is intellectually incoherent. We are pulled in one direction by a belief in open markets, and in another direction by a belief in consumer protection.

There is also a contradiction between professions. The English education minister has recently referred to the importance of teachers regulating themselves; at the same time, the government is proposing independent regulation for solicitors. The nursing profession is moving to an all-graduate entry; at the same time, pressure is being applied to solicitors to admit non-graduates.

Some of the pressures may be contradictory, but the overall theme is clear. Over time, professionals are losing control over many aspects of their professional life, including entry to the profession, training, qualification, rules of conduct, the structure of firms, the terms of their relationships with clients, complaints handling, and expulsion of defaulting members.

In the case of solicitors, the process of emasculation has been a gradual one. First, the profession delegates control over these matters to a ring-fenced subsidiary, with a minority of external lay Board members. The subsidiary employs professional regulators who look at the profession from the outside, and apply their own professional values to regulation, rather than those of the profession that they are regulating. Gradually, they change the rules governing the profession, to make them more like laws than statements of ethical principle.

let goA few years later, the number of lay Board members is increased so that they form a majority, and a lay Chair is appointed. The regulatory body becomes more remote from its parent. Some of the regulations for solicitors seem designed to reduce the SRA’s workload rather than being proper matters for regulation, eg requiring solicitors to run a viable business. Finally, the Chair leads a move to make the regulatory body completely independent from its former parent.

This is what is happening with the solicitors’ profession in England and Wales. In IP Draughts’ view it is the wrong direction for solicitors to take. If we are forced by the government to accept external regulation, so be it. But the model of external regulation should not be based on the self-regulatory model. Self-regulation covers many aspects, including the values that the profession seeks to embody.

familyWhen the Solicitors Regulation Authority was formed, all aspects of the solicitors’ profession, other than representation, were hived off into the SRA, including training, ethical conduct and insurance obligations. This made sense when the SRA was still part of the Law Society family, but in hindsight it was a dangerous route to take. If the SRA is to become completely independent, as the current Chair has recently suggested, then its role should be strictly limited to those aspects that need to be independent, eg misconduct and complaints handling.

This will allow a level, competitive playing field between solicitors and other legal service providers who are bound by the same regulations. At the same time, solicitor should be allowed to impose higher standards on their members, and to offer an upmarket service to clients based on those higher, common standards.

To take a few examples, solicitors have stricter rules than some other service providers in areas such as handling conflicts of interest, acting in the best interests of the client, compulsory insurance (and the terms of that insurance, which seem to annoy some underwriters), and so on.  These and other areas should be under the control of the profession, as part of its USP, rather than a matter for general regulation.

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Filed under Legal policy, Legal practice

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