TT4 has landed

Waiting for IP Draughts when he arrived home last night were two cardboard boxes containing his and Victor’s complimentary copies of the fourth edition of Technology Transfer (TT4).

He is very pleasantly surprised to see the book in print, a mere fortnight after the proofs went to the typesetters. His past experience has been a lead time of 2-3 months. Just-in-time manufacturing has finally reached the publishing industry!

IP Draughts’ longstanding colleague and former trainee, Victor Warner, has been responsible for updating most of TT4, and he has done a very good job. Much has changed in the laws affecting IP transactions since the third edition was published a decade ago. (It is nearly 25 years since the first edition was published, then a paperback under the Butterworths imprint, and then called Technology: The Law of Exploitation and Transfer.)

First edition, 1996

As with previous editions, the book considers law and practice issues through the lens of particular types of commercial agreement, particularly IP licences and R&D collaborations. This is still a relatively unusual way to write a serious law book – many law tomes are focused more on the perspective of the courts, or of academic enquiry, rather than on the commercial transaction.

The book is available direct from the publishers here, or from Amazon UK here.

Similar approach to teaching?

IP Draughts would like to see commercial law taught this way in leading law schools – teaching legal principles from the perspective of real transactions, rather than the other way around. If this had been done when he first studied law at university he would have been far more engaged in the subject. He felt that university law favoured people with very good memories and a capacity for learning dry principles, divorced from their practical context. He doesn’t dismiss those abilities, but it is not the way his mind works, and he suspects there may be many others who share his views, and his way of learning and thinking.

He would like to put this idea into practice, possibly at UCL, but it really needs some sponsorship to set up an institute that would also provide a setting for debate between practitioners, academics and judges – similar to the Institute of Brand and Innovation Law, but with more of a transactional focus. Please let IP Draughts know if you think your firm or organisation might be prepared to sponsor such a venture.

 

 

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Filed under &Law Updates, Book review, Intellectual Property, Legal practice

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