Choice of contract law in light of Brexit

IP Draughts has just returned from a pleasant few days spent in Paris, where he chaired the third annual meeting of BioLawEurope FmbA, a not-for-profit association of specialist life science lawyers across Europe, who mostly work in small firms. In the last 3 years, we have referred dozens of projects between members of the association. IP Draughts’ firm is currently working on a regulatory matter that was referred to us by the German member of the network, and a commercial matter referred by the Danish member.

During our annual conference we have presentations on various topics. One that has stuck in IP Draughts’ mind this year was on choice of law and jurisdiction. When negotiating parties are based in different jurisdictions, they often need to find a compromise jurisdiction on which both of them can agree. Apparently, English law and jurisdiction has been a popular compromise choice, but is currently less popular for some of the BLE members, due to uncertainty over Brexit. Specifically, will there be mutual recognition of judgments between the UK and EU countries after Brexit?

IP Draughts thinks it is likely that the UK and EU will negotiate mutual recognition as part of the Brexit negotiations. Although the UK government is playing its cards very close to its chest, there is some ‘mood music’ to suggest that it recognises the importance of maintaining the reputation of England and Wales as a jurisdiction of choice. This seems to be a relatively uncontroversial topic where common sense would suggest that arrangements similar to those currently applicable (under Rome and Brussels regulations) will be agreed.

However, just because something makes sense and is uncontroversial is no guarantee that it will be negotiated, given the extraordinary times in which we live, so IP Draughts understands the short-term concerns that were expressed at our Paris meeting.

Part of our discussion was about the features of litigation in different jurisdictions. This discussion left IP Draughts feeling that, recognition issues apart, England and Wales had much to recommend it, including:

  1. A summary judgment procedure to get rid of spurious cases (unlike, it seems, France).
  2. Disclosure (also know as discovery) procedures to obtain access to the internal documents of the other party (unlike most civil law jurisdictions).
  3. Oral advocacy and cross-examination of witnesses, which tests the strength of the case in court, rather than relying mostly on written submissions (unlike in most civil law jurisdictions).
  4. A judiciary made up of experienced advocates, rather than career judges.
  5. A system of ‘without prejudice’ communications that are not disclosed to the court, and which facilitate freer communications in negotiations (unlike, it seems, Austria).
  6. The winning party usually gets a court order that most of its legal costs must be paid by the losing party. Apparently, in Austria, Germany and some other countries there is a tariff system which pays only a small proportion of the costs actually incurred. At the same time, for smaller cases in the Intellectual Property Enterprise Court, in London, there is a cap on legal costs of £50,000.

Other issues that we discussed included whether a non-English court would be willing to conduct the case in the English language, if the parties agree to do so. Apparently this is possible in Denmark but not in many civil law jurisdictions, where every document relied on must be  translated into the local language and certified to be an accurate translation, which can add considerably to a party’s costs.

Increasingly, IP Draughts is wondering whether Ireland might be an answer to some of these issues, bearing in mind that its legal system shares many features with that of England and Wales, particularly if the mutual recognition point is not dealt with in a timely manner.

But IP Draughts is crossing his fingers in the hope and expectation that all will turn out well in the next couple of years.

 

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Filed under Commercial negotiation, Contract drafting

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