Remedies for breach of warranty

Beware of Daphne, bearing grease...

Beware of Daphne, bearing grease…

At one level, the case of Idemitsu Kosan Co Ltd v Sumitomo Corporation [2016] EWHC 1909 (Comm) (27 July 2016), reported on BAILII last week, is of limited interest. It is only a hearing of an application for summary judgment, before a deputy judge.

Nevertheless, it is a decision of the Commercial Court, and is a useful reminder of several points:

  1. That parties will argue obscure legal points if enough money is at stake, or if their “normal” legal remedies are time-barred (in this case there was a time limit of 18 months from completion for any warranty claim to be brought).
  2. That High Court judges can and will come up with different answers to those obscure points, and if there is not a good Court of Appeal authority on them, the chances of an unpredictable outcome are increased.
  3. That the issue of whether a party can bring a claim in tort for misrepresentation as well as, or instead of, one for breach of contract, is alive and kicking and can take many forms. It does not depend solely on whether the parties used the phrase “represents and warrants” in their contract.

The parties in this case were two Japanese companies who entered into a share sale agreement. A subsequent dispute with a third party resulted in the buyer suffering loss. The buyer was unable to bring a claim for breach of warranty because the agreed time period for bringing such a claim had expired. It argued that it also had a right to claim for misrepresentation, which was not time-barred. In other words, the buyer argued the same set of facts that caused it a loss gave rise to parallel claims for (a) breach of contract and (b) misrepresentation under the law of tort.

This was not a case where the argument was based on lead-in wording in the relevant clauses that the seller “represents and warrants” a series of statements. The clause in this case started with the following words:

Each of the Sellers warrants to the Buyer in respect of itself and its Relevant Shares in the terms of the Warranties in paragraphs 1 and 2 of Schedule 4

The buyer nevertheless argued that the matters warranted were also representations that were actionable under tort laws, including the Misrepresentation Act 1967.

This was despite the presence of another clause in the agreement which read:

The Buyer acknowledges and agrees with the Sellers that:

(a) it has not relied on, or been induced to enter into, this Agreement by any representations, warranties or undertakings of any kind other than the Warranties (as modified by the Disclosure Letter); and

(b) the Sellers shall not be liable to the Buyer (whether in equity, contract, tort or under the Misrepresentation Act 1967 or otherwise) for any warranty or undertaking which is not set out in this Agreement and the Buyer shall not be entitled to terminate or rescind this Agreement as a result of a breach of this Agreement, including the Warranties (for which the Buyer’s only remedy shall be in damages for breach of contract).

The buyer argued that the Warranties (as set out in Schedule 4 to the agreement) should be treated as representations as well as contractual promises and therefore the above clause did not prevent it from bringing a claim for misrepresentation.

The judge was referred to conflicting authorities on this point, namely:

  1. The decision of Arnold J. in Invertec Ltd v (1) De Mol Holding BV, (2) Henricus Albertus de Mol [2009] EWHC 2471 (Ch) which supported the proposition that a claim for misrepresentation could be brought.
  2. The contrary decision of Mann J. in Sycamore Bidco Ltd v (1) Sean Breslin, (2) Andrew Dawson [2012] EWHC 3443 (Ch).
Arnold J and Mann J have a disagreement

Arnold J and Mann J disagree

In the words of the deputy judge in the present case, “Mann J. gave fully reasoned consideration to the question, and to the decision of Arnold J. in the earlier case. He refused to follow Arnold J., not on the basis that there was any room to distinguish between the contractual wording in the two cases but because he disagreed with Arnold J.’s view as a matter of principle.” The deputy judge agreed with Mann J’s view on this point.

It seems that it was not entirely clear to the deputy judge whether the buyer’s argument was based on the idea of a prior representation made prior to signing the share sale agreement, that induced the buyer to enter into the share sale agreement, or of a representation that was made as part of the share sale agreement. Either way, the claim failed.

One of the deputy judge’s many stated reasons for coming to this view was that there was no express statement that the warranties were also to be treated as representations:

In some cases that problem is solved by an express provision making certain contractual statements representations. In such a case the parties have agreed as to their nature and how they should be treated. However, that is not the present case.

IP Draughts is disappointed by this last comment, which is a little glib and was not considered in detail. It suggests that the judge might have accepted the buyer’s argument if a formula such as “represents and warrants” had been used. That is far from a foregone conclusion, in IP Draughts’ view, though he is aware than many practitioners in the M&A field have a similar view to the judge on this point.

IP Draughts hopes that this topic will get an airing at the UCL panel discussion to be held in London on 8 November, Dysfunction in Contract Drafting, at which Ken Adams, Mr Justice Flaux, Kate Gibbons of Clifford Chance, and Kristin McFetridge of British Telecom’s legal department will be speaking. So far, 169 people have booked their (free) tickets for this event. Don’t miss out on what will be an interesting and lively occasion!169

 

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Filed under Contract drafting, Legal practice

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