Brexit and IP transactions

eliteIP Draughts learnt this week that he was part of a metropolitan elite. Which is nice. #lookingforthepositive

Yesterday the UK electorate decided, unexpectedly, to leave the European Union. At this stage, no-one knows what will happen next, or what “leaving” actually means. The possibilities, however far-fetched some of them may be, include:

  • Change of mind. Nothing changes in the EU (except, perhaps, some face-saving remarks by EU leaders or trivial changes in law), following which the UK electorate has a change of heart and decides not to leave after all. Some point to the Irish experience with the Lisbon treaty as a precedent for this outcome.
  • Squeezing some more concessions. Negotiate real “improvements” in the way in which the EU does things, following which the UK electorate has a second vote in which they decide to remain in the EU, either in a referendum or by voting in a general election for a pro-remain political party. These improvements might be concessions for the UK alone, or general changes in the structure of the EU.
  • demographicsAssociate membership. Create a new, “associate member” category of membership of the EU, which the UK would then transfer to, and which would give associate members some exemptions from EU rules, eg on free movement of labour.
  • Leave and join EFTA. Leave the EU and join the European Free Trade Association, and therefore benefit from some but not all of the legal regime that applies in the EU, but without any special concessions for the UK. In other words, have the same relationship with the EU that Norway has as an EFTA member.
  • Leave and expand EU rights for non-EU members. Leave the EU and change the rules of the EU, so that countries that are outside the EU (ie the UK at that point) can benefit from certain aspects of the EU that are currently only available to members (eg participation in the Community Trade Mark regime). The new arrangements might be designed for, say EFTA members (if the UK decided to join that club) or might be made more broadly available to, say, European countries that are outside the EU.
  • Leave and negotiate one-off trade deals. Negotiate individual, arms-length trade treaties between the UK (as a non-EU-member) and the EU.

social-classesIt is fair to say that the Brexiteers have not focussed on IP during the pre-referendum debates. When Brexit is negotiated, IP legislation is likely to be some way down the list of priorities, after immigration, trade tariffs, and other political topics.

In the area of business regulation, much was made during the referendum campaign of so-called “Brussels red tape” but few examples were given. In one televised debate, IP Draughts heard Boris comment scornfully that the remain campaign didn’t want to change any existing EU laws, “not even the Clinical Trials Directive”, as though this was self-evidently a terrible piece of legislation. For some reason, this law seems to trigger a response in Boris, like a mood-altering drug.  The benefits to the UK economy of pan-European regulation of life-science product development seem to have passed him by.

elite2Perhaps Boris is not aware that the UK has a thriving life-science sector, the best in Europe, and that being part of the EU is a significant benefit for that sector. David Cameron seems to be aware of this, as he negotiated for the UK to have the chemistry and life-science part of the central court for the Unitary Patent.

It is impossible to know what the implications of Brexit will be for international IP transactions until the blueprint for Brexiting has been established. Nevertheless, there are some obvious risks that can be addressed when drafting IP-related agreements. They include:

  1. EU research funding. In research agreements that benefit from EU funding (eg under the Horizon 2020 programme) what will happen if the UK party ceases to receive EU funding on Brexit? Is it still obliged to do the work but not get paid for it? Or can it terminate its participation in the project? As a separate issue, what do the terms of funding say about the grant of IP rights to companies that are outside the EU? Is any preference given to EU parties?
  2. EU territory. Does the agreement grant rights to a territory defined as the European Union or the European Economic Area? What are the implications if the UK is no longer part of the EU or EEA?
  3. UK territory. Does the agreement refer to the United Kingdom? What implications are there for the agreement if Scotland decides to withdraw from the United Kingdom (but possibly try to remain in the EU)?
  4. Definition of IP. How is intellectual property defined in the agreement? Is the definition flexible enough to cater for changes to the IP system, or new types of IP, that may emerge following Brexit?
  5. Export of personal data outside EU. Sometimes, agreements have clauses that refer to the export of personal data outside the EU. Have the implications been considered of what this will mean in practical terms if the UK is no longer part of the EU?
  6. Compliance with regulations generally. Some agreements, eg clinical trial agreements, impose an obligation on a party to comply with applicable regulations. Are these obligations worded in a way that is resilient to the possibility of UK regulations being significantly different from those in the EU?
  7. Law and jurisdiction. Does the agreement have a clear law and jurisdiction clause? If not, bear in mind that if the UK is not part of the EU, the Rome and Brussels regulations will probably no longer apply to tell a UK contracting party which law and jurisdiction will govern the agreement.

This is unlikely to be a comprehensive list of contractual issues that could be affected by Brexit. If you can think of others, please suggest them in the comments below this posting.

 

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Filed under Intellectual Property, Legal practice, Legal Updates

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