10 year campaign by Law Society to change IP law: we’re nearly there

queen speechThis week, Her Majesty the Queen nearly used the words “intellectual property” in public. From her throne in the House of Lords, she outlined the Government’s legislative programme for the current Parliamentary term. The speech focussed on matters of general interest. Perhaps it was unrealistic to expect the Government (which writes her speeches on these occasions) to ask Her Majesty to refer specifically to the Intellectual Property (Unjustified Threats) Bill. Instead, it was swept up in the phrase “Other measures will be laid before you.”

Nevertheless, the Government’s supporting papers, issued at the same time as the speech, make clear that this Bill is one of 21 that they will introduce in the coming months.

The announcement gets us very close to a successful conclusion of a campaign that the Law Society’s Intellectual Property Law Committee initiated in about 2006. The exact date on which we started work is lost in the mists of time, but I have managed to find a committee paper on this subject dated February 2006. As that paper noted:

Today we have an illogical and inconsistent assortment of threats actions relating to various IP rights; they run counter to the over-arching encouragement [e.g. in the Civil Procedure Rules] to communicate and settle rather than precipitately issue legal proceeding and they leave clients and solicitors in jeopardy of  being sued for making actionable threats, simply by reason of the sending of what would otherwise be an uncontroversial letter before action.

Robin Fry

Robin Fry

I am now the Chairman of the IPLC, but credit for this campaign lies mainly with others. Among the many committee members who have worked on the project, two names stand out: Robin Fry, a former member of the committee, who led the discussions and drafted our position papers in the early years, and Isabel Davies, who chaired the committee from 2006 until 2015.

Isabel Davies

Isabel Davies

The IP threats provisions are complex and technical, but in essence they provide a legal remedy to someone who is threatened with IP litigation. The recipient  of the threat can sue the threatener for making “unjustified threats”. How you view these provisions may depend on what question is asked. If you are asked, should we have laws that stop aggressive IP owners from using spurious IP claims to bully smaller businesses and consumers into buying their products (or avoiding competing products), the answer may be yes.

If, on the other hand, you are asked whether struggling creative artists, whose IP is being misused by major companies without acknowledgement or compensation, should be inhibited from asserting their IP rights by satellite litigation that focuses on their precise choice of words in correspondence, then the answer may be no.

At this point, and unusually for this blog, I feel the need to issue a dislaimer. To discuss this subject, we need to get technical, but this journalistic overview should not be used as legal advice. Don’t use any of the information in this article when asserting or defending IP claims!

ceaseEnglish IP owners (or their lawyers) who know about these laws have typically drafted “cease and desist” letters (to use an American term) in the most bland of terms, to avoid being accused of making threats. Unless the recipient of the letter is also in-the-know, and can interpret the code, they are left none the wiser by the letter. Some lawyers have taken the view that even a bland letter is too risky, and that the only safe course of action is to issue proceedings before communicating with the infringer; once proceedings are started, the threats provisions no longer apply. These strategies run completely against the spirit of the English civil procedure rules, where clear and open communication is required.

Yet another strategy is to focus, in the letter, on types of IP that are not covered by the threats provisions. For example, a product might infringe both copyright and design rights. A “clever” lawyer might try to draft a letter threatening (only) to sue for copyright infringement which is not covered by the threats provisions, and avoid mentioning design rights, which are covered by threats provisions.

In other words, the threats provisions are the cause of some absurd behaviour by IP owners and their specialist lawyers.

By contrast, the IP owner who cannot afford specialist UK IP lawyers, and who communicates in clear terms with an alleged infringer, is at great risk of being sued for making threats. Note that the previous sentence refers to “specialist UK IP lawyers”: one of the leading cases on this subject in recent years concerned correspondence from a Spanish law firm that might not have been expected to know the quirks of English law in this area. English law is out of line with most other jurisdictions on this subject.

As specialist IP practitioners, our committee saw that this area of English law wasn’t working properly, and needed to be changed. However, we faced several obstacles. First, the subject was very technical, and unlikely to get much political interest. Secondly, several IP judges were against change, at least in the early days. The IP judges have influence with legislators.

From a judge’s perspective, IP threats provisions might be thought useful as a curb on egregious behaviour by aggressive IP owners. But the judge only sees the cases that come before him or her, and not the large number of claims that are settled before they reach court, or which are not made at all, due to the dampening effect of the threats legislation. As practitioners “at the coalface” we could see what the judges apparently could not see.

law commissionSo, we didn’t get much traction for our ideas in the early years. But we persisted, and kept arguing the case for change, for example in our responses to Government-sponsored reviews of the IP system, including the Gowers and Hargreaves reviews. Eventually the Law Commission decided to take up this issue, with our active encouragement. They issued a consultation document, and later a report recommending changes, which our committee largely supported. The Government mostly accepted the Law Commission’s recommendations. The threats provisions are not to be abolished, but they are to be greatly improved, and made more consistent between IP types.

The Law Commission and the Parliamentary Draftsmen’s Office prepared a draft Bill to effect these changes, on which our committee provided detailed comments. Last year, one of our regular committee meetings focussed on this subject; our invited guests included three representatives of the Law Commission, two from the Parliamentary Draftsmen’s Office, and two from the Intellectual Property Office. My main contribution to that discussion, as a transactional IP lawyer rather than a litigator, was to challenge the use of the term “best endeavours” in the draft Bill; the wording was changed in a later draft.

The Bill is now set to be introduced in the House of Lords by a special procedure that is used for uncontroversial measures.

Sometimes, the law is changed through vigorous political activity. Our campaign illustrates a different approach: it is possible to achieve important, but very technical, changes to the law through patient committee work.

 

 

 

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