Scouting for knowledge transfer

job doneLast night, to the PraxisUnico Chairman’s Dinner, held in a room overlooking the lovely gardens of Worcester College, Oxford.  The guest speaker was Will Hutton, writer, journalist, habitue of the corridors of power, and recently appointed Principal of Hertford College, Oxford.

Ably led by the PraxisUnico Chairman, Phil Clare, and with thought-provoking comments from Will Hutton, we had a stimulating discussion of university knowledge transfer and its place in the future of the UK economy.  The Chatham House Rule prevents this blogger from attributing comments to individuals, but among the themes discussed were:

  • the role of General Purpose Technologies (GPTs), and whether and how UK Government policy should seek to support the development of GPTs;
  • the extent to which we should adopt an Open Innovation model for university knowledge transfer;
  • the role of HEIF (Higher Education Innovation Fund) funding, the rules around its use, and its relationship to general Government funding of research;
  • how one could or should measure the success of knowledge transfer activities, and how one might demonstrate that Government funding in this area had been well-spent; and
  • the role of university knowledge transfer managers as scouts for finding new technologies that will support the UK economy.

This blogger wondered whether there should be a controlled experiment to see whether funding of university knowledge transfer had been successful.  This might involve giving funds to one university and withholding them from another, and seeing how well each of them does.  Volunteers, anyone?

Leave a comment

Filed under Legal policy

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s